About Us – Aims & Objectives

Wild Futures’ aims:

  • To promote the welfare and conservation of primates.
  • To provide a home for life to primates in need of rescue and rehabilitation.
  • To end the trade in primates for any purpose and the abuse of primates in captivity.
  • To conserve and restore natural habitats in the UK and abroad through funding, education and sustainable practices.

Our objectives:

  • To deliver far-reaching environmental education and awareness campaigns, whilst offering expert advice to specialist forums.
  • To lobby central and local government and work with partner organisations and the wider public in spearheading the campaign to end the trade in primates as pets in the UK.
  • To maintain wildlife habitats at our project sites in the UK in order to protect native endangered species whilst applying sustainable environmental management policies.
  • To provide funding, advice and exchange programmes to aid primate welfare and the preservation of primate habitats abroad.
  • To operate a sanctuary for ex-pet and unwanted monkeys in need of rehabilitation that provides an exceptional level of care and employs innovative and responsive management techniques which take into account individual needs and species-specific requirements.

Key to our success:

  • 50 years of experience – leaders in our field.
  • Dedicated employees, Ambassadors and volunteers are committed to Wild Futures’ vision, ensuring that we continue to meet the highest of standards in all areas.
  • Expertise enables us to advise at government level on primate welfare and conservation issues.

 

In 2014 we celebrate 50 years of our organisation.  Starting life as The Monkey Sanctuary in 1964, the organisation has evolved into leading primate welfare charity, Wild Futures: rescuing, educating and campaigning for primate welfare in the UK and overseas.

50 years logo final

 

 

 

 

William Mcgrew copy

Primates are not domesticated animals, bred by humans over generations to be companions. They are wild creatures, unfortunate enough to be held captive in unnatural circumstances. However well meaning their human
captors, primates should not be kept as pets. They need the company of their own kind in settings as naturalistic as possible, if they cannot be returned to the wild.

Professor William McGrew
University of Cambridge

News

Primate welfare charities condemn use of a performing monkey in Pirates of the Caribbean 5

February 19, 2015 - 17 February 2015 Wild Futures and campaign partners at Animals Australia,  ... Read More

Wild Futures’ Team warm this winter thanks to Result Clothing!

February 5, 2015 - Wild Futures’ staff were recently delighted when Result Clothing ... Read More

Happiness for Daisy the Monkey in the New Year

January 9, 2015 - 8th January 2015 Following a public appeal, an animal charity has rescued a ... Read More
More News Updates >

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Accrediations Celebrating 50 Years