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Who is she? The Clever Little Girl

Special skills: Using her intelligence to get what she wants

Adopt Amy

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Please note that overseas adoptions cannot be paid for by monthly direct debit. You can pay annually via credit/debit card.

Adopting

Adopting a monkey with Wild Futures really is a gift with a difference. Whether it’s a gift for yourself or another, you will be supporting the work of our charity and enabling us to protect primates and their habitats worldwide. The monkeys featured in the adoption scheme reside at projects run by Wild Futures. Each monkey is unique with their own characters and personalities so please do check out their monkey pictures and profiles. As a Monkey adopter you will receive:

  • A cuddly monkey toy (optional)
  • Personalised certificate of your adoption
  • Photo of your adopted monkey
  • Your monkey’s story
  • Species factsheet
  • Wild Futures newsletters throughout the year
  • Discounted entry fee to our Monkey Sanctuary

About Amy

Amy’s parents Betty and Elvis lived at an Animal Care College. By 2012 it was apparent to the college that the capuchin group was unsuitable for students to practise hands-on animal care on and Wild Futures’ Monkey Sanctuary was asked to rehome the whole group. Amy was born at the college, as the second of four youngsters. She was initially called Andre.

On the way to her new home in Cornwall, Amy paid a visit to the Sanctuary’s veterinary for a thorough health check - and to have a vasectomy… The Sanctuary has a non-breeding policy as we do not believe primates should be bred to spend their lives in captivity, but luckily Amy could avoid the whole procedure as it was soon clear that she is not a boy, but a little girl!!!

Amy’s mum Betty is a low ranking female in the group, who sometimes gets picked on by Sue and her son Banjo. Banjo is a great friend and playmate to Amy, but she knows her position very well and has already learned to use her intelligence to get what she wants, whereas her friend Banjo gets away with just plain straight-forwardness. Amy knows how to hide and look inconspicuous when nice food is going around, not drawing any negative attention to herself, but as soon as the coast is clear she is quick as the wind! Growing up in a group with other youngsters will teach Amy a huge number of essential social skills that so many of our other capuchins, rescued from a solitary past in the pet trade, have missed out on.